Not A Lot of Me Around Me

I’ve been a writer for a decent amount of time. Be it personally, professionally, or anything in between, writing is what I do. It’s more than a passion for me, it’s a way to not only express myself, but also make sure that all of my thoughts are collected, information is passed on, and everything is set in stone in a nice and organized fashion. When it comes to tech writing, tech journalism, I enjoy the ability to know a company did thing x and how it relates to thing y or thing z they had mentioned in 1980. Knowing the possibilities new tech can have on the future, talking about it, explaining it – I love it all. The same goes for games, but that’s a more gritty topic (basically why Nintendo is king and always will be) that I’ll talk about some other time. However, with a dramatic shift from me making sites, owning them myself, and publishing my own articles, to me looking for jobs in the field, it hits like a truck to look at staff lists and see either no people of color, few people of color, or just a sea of white men. Having …

Tech Around Me

Ever since getting my first Mac, I’ve always felt a sense of “difference” between myself and everyone I’d talk to. Back then, people would gather on IRC channels with the only sign of relatability between me and them being that we had chosen an Apple computer over the various amounts of other. Occasionally, we’d all talk about the new iPhones that were announced, the new OS updates, how certain apps looked promising, even themeing our systems – it was all great. I even feel a sense of nostalgia simply sitting here typing about it and remembering the moments that seem so lost as everyone has moved on with their lives. However, there’s always been a feeling of separation – at least for me – that I regret for allowing myself to feel and “fall victim” to.

It’s nothing heinous or dastardly – it’s simply that my race failed to mean anything in these moments. Not that I was seen as “the black guy” or that I was treated any differently, but that things were inherently different, odd, or simply misunderstood whenever conversations outside of tech were to take place. Meaning, my blackness and the culture therein would be something that …